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Thursday, 3 June 2010

Bastille stormed by undocumented workers


Travailleurs sans papiers from ana dumitrescu on Vimeo.

Source: AFP

[Google translation] The French government is calling Tuesday "to reason and good sense" on the 5th day of occupancy of the steps of the Opera Bastille in Paris by more than a thousand undocumented workers, many of them Africans, calling for clear criteria for regularization of work.

"The Franco-African summit in Nice on the French government increases the declarations of friendship for Africa and Africans. It is indeed ironic that at the same time, he insists on maintaining the overexploitation and lawlessness workers without papers, "said the group, the fifth day of occupation of the steps of the opera by the undocumented.

Many black African immigrants, some from China, and worked for years in France.

The release is entitled "Âsoutakhou the Bastille" which means "everyone sits and sits" Soninke, a lingua franca of West Africa.

"After more than seven months of strike, it is time that the French government see reason and common sense will prevail" and "it's time to finally agree the speech acts," the group of eleven unions ( as the CGT and CFDT) or organizations (such as the League of Human Rights).

After a first movement in the Ile-de-France in 2008, strikes and workplace occupations by undocumented workers have resumed since October 2009, particularly in the cleaning industry or construction.

Undocumented migrants have benefited from the presence of 38 African leaders in Nice on Monday to ask since, through several events in Paris and Nice, their participation in the economic life of France is acknowledged.



[original]
Salariés africains sans-papiers: le gouvernement français appelé "au bon sens"

Le gouvernement français s'est fait appeler mardi "à la raison et au bon sens" au 5e jour d'occupation des marches de l'opéra Bastille à Paris par plus d'un millier de salariés sans-papiers, dont beaucoup d'Africains, réclamant des critères clairs de régularisation par le travail.

"Au sommet franco-africain de Nice, le gouvernement français multiplie les déclarations d'amitié à l'intention de l'Afrique et des Africains. Il serait vraiment paradoxal qu'au même moment, il s'obstine à maintenir dans la surexploitation et le non-droit les travailleuses et travailleurs sans papiers", a souligné ce collectif, au cinquième jour d'occupation des marches de l'opéra par les sans papiers.

Beaucoup ont immigré d'Afrique noire, certains de Chine, et travaillent depuis des années en France.

Le communiqué est intitulé "Âsoutakhou à la Bastille" ce qui signifie "tout le monde s'asseoit et reste assis" en soninké, une langue véhiculaire d'Afrique de l'Ouest.

"Après plus de sept mois de grève, il est temps que le gouvernement français entende raison et que le bon sens l'emporte" et "il serait temps que les actes s'accordent enfin aux discours", ajoute le collectif de onze syndicats (comme la CGT et la CFDT) ou associations (comme la Ligue des Droits de l'Homme).

Après un premier mouvement en Ile-de-France en 2008, grèves et occupations d'entreprises par des sans-papiers salariés ont repris depuis octobre 2009, notamment dans le secteur du nettoyage ou de la construction.

Les sans-papiers ont profité de la présence de 38 dirigeants africains à Nice depuis lundi pour demander, au travers de plusieurs manifestations à Paris et Nice, que leur participation à la vie économique de la France soit reconnue.
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2 comments:

  1. Here's a better translation:

    Calls for reason and common sense were directed at the French government on Tuesday, the 5th day that the steps of the Opera Bastille in Paris were occupied by more than a thousand undocumented workers, many of them Africans, calling for clear work permit criteria.

    "At the Franco-African summit in Nice, the French government constantly declares its friendship for Africa and Africans. It would be really ironic if at the same time it insisted on maintaining the overexploitation and disentitlement of workers without papers," said the collective.

    Many had immigrated from Black Africa, and some from China, and have been working in France for years.

    The news release is entitled "Âsoutakhou at the Bastille" which means "everyone sits and stays seated" in Soninke, a lingua franca of West Africa.

    "After more than seven months of strike, it is time for the French government to see reason and for common sense to prevail" and "it would be time for actions to finally catch up with words," added the group of eleven labour unions (such as the CGT and CFDT) and associations (such as the Human Rights League).

    After the movement began in the Ile-de-France in 2008, strikes and workplace occupations by undocumented workers resumed in October 2009, particularly in the cleaning and construction industries.

    Through several demonstrations in Paris and Nice, the undocumented wokers took advantage of the presence of 38 African leaders in Nice since Monday to demand that their participation in the economic life of France be acknowledged.

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